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Chup for 3sixteen: Indigo Socks.

Chup for 3sixteen: Indigo Socks.
Two pairs of socks lying flat on a wooden surface.
Close up shot of the pattern details on the collaboration socks.
Close up of the CHUP and 3sixteen branding on the bottom of the socks.
Close up of the Made in Japan stamp on sock.
Collaborative presentation flasher on sock.

We've been releasing quite a few collaborative projects this holiday season - they've all been in the works for quite some time and we're excited that they are all coming to fruition. Next up is a project that we worked on with Japanese sock specialists CHUP. We've been fans of CHUP's work for some time now and exhibited across from them at Jumble Tradeshow a year and a half ago, where we had the opportunity to meet their sales and design team. From there, a relationship was forged and we began discussing ways to work together. The result was a sock style made exclusively for us, crafted of indigo-dyed yarns entirely in Japan on CHUP's famed vintage sock-knitting machines.  Only 250 pairs of each colorway were made, and they will be available via our website at noon EST on Friday, December 4th, and via select retailers. 

CHUP, a brand under the Glen Clyde umbrella, specializes in intricate socks that resemble hand-knit varieties from decades past. They routinely design new seasonal patterns based on old Nordic, Fair Isle, and Native American styles. We chose a pattern called "Sonoran" from CHUP's archives and paired it with Japanese indigo-dyed yarns to create a unique sock that will fade over time as the sock is worn and washed. 

One of our favorite features about CHUP socks are their hand-linked toes. Most commercially-produced socks are knit on a circular machine and the heels and toes are then sewn down, creating a ridge on the inside of the sock. CHUP socks are closed up on a hand-linking machine that utilizes a single thread to give the heel and toe a flat, seamless finish. It's a time-consuming process that few companies offer anymore; you can see this machine at work here.